PP5223
POPULATION AGEING, PUBLIC POLICY, AND FAMILY (2014/2015, Semester 2) 

 MODULE OUTLINE Created: 29-Nov-2014, Updated: 29-Nov-2014
 
Module Code PP5223
Module Title POPULATION AGEING, PUBLIC POLICY, AND FAMILY
Semester Semester 2, 2014/2015
Modular Credits 4
Faculty Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
Department Lee Kuan Yew School Of Public Policy
Timetable Timetable/Teaching Staff
Module Facilitators
DR Kim Hye Won Lecturer
Weblinks
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Learning Outcomes | Syllabus | Workload


 LEARNING OUTCOMES Top
This course covers policy issues of modern ageing societies, with special emphases on families and comparisons between Asian and Western countries. To tackle the complex issues, we discuss both relevant theories and empirical evidence from various disciplines. The first part investigates demographic causes of population ageing–decreased fertility and extended longevity. The second part reviews public old-age support programs and discuss their challenges. We also describe policy options to mitigate the consequences of population ageing, and assess the effectiveness of the policies. The third part examines why families provide elder support, and how public and private old-age provisions are interrelated.


 SYLLABUS Top
PP5223. Population Ageing, Public Policy, and Family
 
National University of Singapore
Semester 2, AY 2014/2015
 
 
Class Times:                 Mondays 2:00-5:00PM
Class Location:             TBA
Instructor:                     Erin Hye-Won Kim, Assistant Professor in LKYSPP Office: LKS #02-04
Office hour: By appointment (office)     
                      
 
Course Description
 
This course covers policy issues of modern ageing societies, with special emphases on social policy, families, and comparisons between Asian countries and Western countries.  To tackle the complex issues, we discuss both relevant theories and empirical evidence from various disciplines including sociology, economics, public health, and human biology.  The first section investigates the underlying causes of population ageing and presents trends in population age distributions around the globe.  In the second section, we review old-age support provided by the government, the family, and the elderly themselves, and discuss challenges of providing the support.  Lastly, the third section describes policy options to mitigate the consequences of population ageing, and evaluates the policies.
 
 
Course Objectives
 
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
  • Define key demographic measures and use them to describe demographic trends
  • Explain causes of population ageing
  • Illustrate major public old-age support programs and discuss their challenges
  • Explain why families provide elder support, compare the support across societies, and analyze how the private support relates to public elder support
  • List and evaluate policy options to mitigate the consequences of population ageing
  • Examine policy issues with critical thinking and analytic writing based on inter-disciplinary approaches
  • Comprehend and take advantage of statistics and empirical arguments
 
Course Materials
 
No textbook is required for this course.  Instead, reading assignments will be available via IVLE or handed out in class in advance.  
 
 
Prerequisites
 
There are no prerequisites for this course.
 
 
Course Outline
 
Week Topics Country Cases
1 Shopping week
2 Trends/Causes of aging (I): Decline in fertility China and other countries
3 Trends/Causes of aging (II): Decline in mortality and
extended longevity
USA and other countries
4 Taking care of the elderly (I): Government Korea
5 Taking care of the elderly (II): Family
6 Taking care of the elderly (III): Synthesis
Presentation on country case study
Recess Week (No class)  
7 Policy options (I): Policies to raise fertility and their efficiency Japan
8 (eLearning Exercise)
9 Policy options (II): Other policy options and their efficiency
10 Policy options (III): Synthesis
Presentation on country case study
11 Capstone case (I): Synthesis Singapore
12 Capstone case (II): Synthesis
13 Capstone case (III): Synthesis
Presentation on country case study
Exam Week Policy memo due May 1 Country of your choice
 
 

 
 
Grading and Course Expectations
 
This course will be taught using the flipped classroom approach, so preparation for class in advance and participation in class will be vital (see below). 
 
  • Reading assignments and class participation (30%).  Class participation will be based on attendance and regular and constructive participation in class discussion.  Students should read assigned reading materials and be prepared to participate in active discussion.  Feedback on class participation will be provided on a regular basis. 
 
The class participation grade will be an aggregate grade based on an average of all the classes in the module, with the two lowest scores being dropped before this is calculated.  Medical leave with a valid medical certificate or absence with valid reason will not count in the scoring.  Absence from class without good reason will be counted as zero participation. 
 
  • Examples:
    - Full attendance: best 9 out of 11 scores
    - Medical leave with medical certificate or absence with valid reason for one class: best 8 out of   
the 10 classes attended.
- Absent without good reason for 1 class: best 9 out of 11 scores (the missing day will be 0)


  • In-class presentations about case studies (45%).  Students will make in-class team presentations for three case studies.  These presentations will require some team preparation outside of class, and will be graded on a team basis.  Detailed information on each case study will be distributed in advance. 
 
  • Presentation (I): Korea’s elder-support systems (15%, week 7)
  • Presentation (II): Japan’s policies to cope with population aging (15%, week 10)
  • Presentation (III): Singapore’s Population White Paper (15%, week 13)
 
  • Policy memo (25%, due May 1).  Each student will write a policy memo on a policy question (about 10 pages, double-spaced, excluding references and tables/figures).  You should choose a question that relates to course materials and interests you for a country of your choice.  The memo should consist of short introduction, background (2 pages), policy options (2 pages), evaluation criteria (0.5 page), analysis (3 pages), policy recommendations (2 page), and short conclusion (references and tables/figures in appendices).  The memo should be a good mix of your own ideas and what you learn from this class. 
 
 
Academic Integrity
 
Students in this class should adhere to NUS Honour Code, which can be found at http://www.nus.edu.sg/registrar/adminpolicy/acceptance.html#NUSHonourCode. In addition, the LKY School’s Code of Conduct (http://www.spp.nus.edu.sg/Code_of_Conduct.aspx) lists academic integrity as one of its six important values.  Violations of these codes in any form, including cheating in exams and plagiarism, will not be tolerated and will immediately lead to the student getting zero marks and follow-up action.
    Plagiarism includes copying all or any part of your classmate’s assignments. To avoid giving the impression that you are passing off other people’s work as your own, you will need to acknowledge conscientiously the sources of information, ideas, and arguments used in your paper. For this purpose, you will use the ‘footnote style’ according to the Chicago Manual of Style, the guidelines for which can be found online at http://www.dianahacker.com/resdoc/p04_c10_s2.html in the companion website for Diana Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference. Please also refer to the handout that was given to you at the Workshop on Plagiarism conducted during the Orientation period. 

 
Reading ASSIGNMENTs
 
 
1. DEMOGRPHIC AGING
 
Week 1. Introduction to demography
 
 
Week 2. Trends / Causes of aging (I): Decline in fertility
 
 
Week 3. Trends / Causes of aging (II): Decline in mortality and extended longevity
 
  • McFalls, J. A. 2007. “Population: A lively introduction.” Population Bulletin No. 53.3., Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau. http://www.prb.org/pdf07/62.1LivelyIntroduction.pdf (pp8-12 only)
  • Horiuchi, S. 1999. “Epidemiological transitions in human history.” Pp54-71 in Chamie, J., Cliquet, R.L. (eds.), Health and Mortality: Issues of global concern. Proceedings of the symposium on health and mortality, Brussels, 19-22 November, 1997. CBGS/UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Brussels/New York. (pp54-64 only)
  • Oeppen, J., Vaupel, J. W. 2002. “Broken limits to life expectancy.” Science 296: 1029-31.
  • Olshansky, S. J. Carnes, B. A., Désesquelles, A. 2001. “Prospects for human longevity.” Science 291(5508): 1491-1492.

 
2. TAKING CARE OF THE ELDERLY
 
Week 4. Taking care of the elderly (I): Government
 
  • Rosen, H. “Social insurance I: Social Security and Unemployment Insurance” in Rosen, H. (eds.) Public Finance, McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
  • United Nations. 2007. “Old-age income security.” Chapter V in World Economic and Social Survey 2007. New York: United Nations. (pp89-104 only)
  • Swartz, K. 2013. “Searching for a balance of responsibilities: OECD countries' changing elderly assistance policies.” Annu. Rev. Public Health 34: 397–412. (pp397-406 only)
  • Yoon, H.-S. 2013. “Korea: Balancing economic growth and social protection for older adults.” Gerontologist, 53: 361–368.
 
Week 5. Taking care of the elderly (II): Family
 
 
Week 6. Taking care of the elderly (III): Synthesis
 
  • “Fiscal implications of population aging.” 2011. In Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences. Academic Press.
  • Bongaarts, J. 2004. “Population aging and the rising cost of public pensions.” Population and Development Review 30(1):1-23. (pp1-13 only)
  • United Nations. 2007. “Health and long-term care systems for ageing societies.” Chapter VI in World Economic and Social Survey 2007. New York: United Nations. (pp126-137 only)
  • Gruber, J. 2005. “Public goods” Chapter 7 in Gruber, J. (eds.), Public Finance and Public Policy. New York: Worth Publishers. (pp183-186 only)
 
**** Presentation (I): Korea’s elder-support systems (15%, week 6)
 
 
3. ANALYSIS OF Policies to Mitigate the Consequences of Demographic Aging
 
Week 7. Policy options (I): Policies to raise fertility and their efficiency
 
  • Wolf, D. A., Lee, R. D., Miller, T., Donehower, D., Genest, A. 2011. “Fiscal externalities of becoming a parent” Population Development Review 37(2): 241-266. (pp241-244 only)
  • Gruber, J. 2005. “Externalities: Problems and solutions” Chapter 5 in Gruber, J. (eds.), Public Finance and Public Policy. New York: Worth Publishers. (pp115-123, 128-131 only)
  • Population Reference Bureau Staff. 2004. “Transitions in world population.” Population Bulletin No. 59.1. Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau. http://www.prb.org/Source/ACFFF4.pdf (pp25-31 only)
  • McDonald, P. 2006. “Low fertility and the State: The efficacy of policy.” Population and Development Review 32(3): 485-510. (pp487-8, 498-506 only)
 
Week 8. (eLearning Exercise)
 
Week 9. Policy options (II): Other policy options and their efficiency
 
 
Week 10. Policy options (III): Synthesis
 
  • Bardach, E. 2008. “Step four: Select the criteria.” in Bardach, E. (eds.), A Practical Guide for Policy Analysts: The Eightfold Path to More Effective Problem Solving. Third Edition. CQ Press. (pp25-35 only)
  • Grant, J., Hoorens, S., Sivadasan, S., Loo, M., DaVanzo, J., Hale, L., Gibson, S., B. 2005. “Low fertility and population ageing: Causes, consequences, and policy options.” RAND Europe. http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monographs/2004/RAND_MG206.pdf (pp133-141 only)
-       Wingfield-Hayes, R. “Japan: The worst developed country for working mothers?” BBC News Magazine. 22 March 2013. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21880124
  • Matsui, K., Suzuki, H., Eoyang, C., Akiba, T., Tatebe, K. 2010. “Womenomics 3.0: The time is now.” Goldman Sachs. October 1, 2010.
 
**** Presentation (II): Japan’s policies to cope with population aging (15%, week 10)
 
Week 11. Capstone case (I) : Synthesis
 
  • National Population and Talent Division. 2013. A Sustainable Population for a Dynamic Singapore. Population White Paper. http://202.157.171.46/whitepaper/downloads/population-white-paper.pdf
  • Binstock, R. H. 2010. “From compassionate ageism to intergenerational conflict?” The Gerontologist 50 (5): 574-585.
  • Preston, S. 1984. “Children and the elderly: Divergent paths for America’s dependents,” Demography 21(4): 435-457.
 
Week 12. Capstone case (II): Synthesis
 
  • National Population and Talent Division. 2013. A Sustainable Population for a Dynamic Singapore. Population White Paper. (continued, see link above)
  • Ng, K.-H. 2011. “Review essay: Prospects for old-age income security in Hong Kong and Singapore.” Population Ageing 4:271-293.
  • Phua, K.-H. 2001. “The savings approach to financing long-term care in Singapore”, Journal of Aging and Social Policy 13: 169–83.
  • Rozario, Philip A. & Rosetti, Amanda Leigh. 2012. “Many Helping Hands: A Review and Analysis of Long-term Care Policies, Programs, and Practices in Singapore” Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 55:7, 641-658.
 
Week 13. Capstone case (III) : Synthesis
 
  • National Population and Talent Division. 2013. A Sustainable Population for a Dynamic Singapore. Population White Paper. (see link above)
 
**** Presentation (III): Singapore’s White Paper (15%, week 13)


 WORKLOAD Top
3-0-0-3-4

Workload Components : A-B-C-D-E
A: no. of lecture hours per week
B: no. of tutorial hours per week
C: no. of lab hours per week
D: no. of hours for projects, assignments, fieldwork etc per week
E: no. of hours for preparatory work by a student per week